Selenium Health Topic

Selenium Health Topic

Selenium is a trace mineral that is essential to good health but required only in small amounts. Selenium deficiency can make the body more susceptible to illnesses.1

There are many ongoing research projects investigating selenium, as well as other antioxidants, for the ability to slow the growth of various cancers.3 Both selenium and sulfur bind to a number of heavy, or toxic metals.4 Researchers believe that a deficiency in selenium may contribute in part to development of autoimmune thyroid problems.8 Selenium is an insulin-like trace mineral that transports glucose into tissue for conversion into energy.2

Selenium deficiencies have been recorded in HIV patients.5 Selenium appears to be a key nutrient in counteracting the development of virulence and inhibiting HIV progression to AIDS.10

Dietary Sources of Selenium:
Brazil nuts, rice, whole wheat flour, fish, oysters, turkey, chicken, pork and beef.

Learn More About Selenium

  1. Selenium Fact Sheet: The National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements

    Selenium is a trace mineral that is essential to good health but required only in small amounts. Selenium deficiency can make the body more susceptible to illnesses. People with acute severe illness who develop inflammation and widespread infection often have decreased levels of selenium. Selenium deficiency may worsen the effects of iodine deficiency on thyroid function. Selenium supplements may be protective against goiter. Selenium may prevent or slow tumor growth.

    CONTAINS REFERENCES

  2. Selenium: An Insulin-Mimetic

    Selenium has been shown to mediate a number of insulin-like actions both in vivo and in vitro. These insulin-like actions include stimulating glucose uptake and regulating metabolic processes such as glycolysis and gluconeogenesis.

    SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

  3. Selenium on Diagnose-Me.com

    Selenium is an essential mineral which works closely with vitamin E. Selenium is naturally found in foods high in protein. There are many ongoing research projects investigating selenium, as well as other antioxidants, for the ability to slow the growth of various cancers.

  4. Selenium Cellular Nutrition

    Selenium is synergistic with sulfer. Both selenium and sulfur bind to a number of heavy, or toxic metals, with selenium being protective against cadmium, lead, mercury, and arsenic, while sulfur (being to a lesser degree protective of the same), is also helpful to lower aluminum (or aluminium) levels. Lou Gehrig's disease, or Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) presents with above-normal sulfur and selenium levels. Alzheimer's disease is affected by sulfur (and selenium) intake as well.

  5. Selenium Pills May Combat HIV

    Selenium deficiencies have been recorded in HIV patients, and evidence suggests the mineral can improve the function of the immune system. Taking daily selenium supplements may block the build up of HIV in a patient's blood, research suggests.

  6. Prevention of Bacterial Colonization of Contact Lenses With Covalently Attached Selenium

    The data from this pilot study suggest that a selenium coating on contact lenses might reduce acute red eye and bacterial ulceration because of an inhibition of bacterial colonization.

    SCIENTIFIC STUDY

  7. New Anti-Bacterial Coating May Prolong Contact Lens Life

    Selenium, which is essential to our diet and immune system, kills bacteria by forming something called superoxide radicals.

  8. Supplementing With Selenium May Help Thyroiditis

    Supplementing with selenium may help to slow down the progression of autoimmune thyroid disease -- and may be particulary effective during the onset of thyroiditis. Researchers believe that a deficiency in selenium may contribute in part to development of autoimmune thyroid problems.

  9. Increasing Selenium Intake Decreases Bladder Cancer Risk

    According to the latest research, people with higher selenium intakes had a 39 percent reduced risk of bladder cancer, which is right in line with prior studies that have linked the mineral to lower rates of breast, prostate, lung, colorectal and skin cancer as well.

    CONTAINS REFERENCES

  10. Selenium Conquers AIDS?

    AIDS disease appears to involve a slow and progressive decline in levels of the trace element selenium in the blood. Retroviruses like HIV depress selenium levels in their hosts.

  11. Low Selenium Intake May Raise Risk of Liver Cancer

    Low blood levels of the element selenium may be linked to the increased risk of liver cancer in patients infected with hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses. Selenium levels were significantly lower in those who developed liver cancer compared with those who did not. A previous study has suggested that vitamin E and selenium supplements taken in combination resulted in a 13% reduction in cancer mortality in a population with high rates of esophageal and stomach cancer.

  12. The Mineral Selenium Proves Itself a Powerful Anti-Cancer Medicine

    The mineral selenium has been shown in multiple studies to be an effective tool in warding off various types of cancer, including breast, esophageal, stomach, prostate, liver and bladder cancers. Selenium, especially when used in conjunction with vitamin C, vitamin E and beta-carotene, works to block chemical reactions that create free radicals in the body. Selenium also helps stop damaged DNA molecules from reproducing. The use of selenium during chemotherapy in combination with vitamin A and vitamin E can reduce the toxicity of chemotherapy drugs. The mineral also helps "enhance the effectiveness of chemo, radiation, and hyperthermia while minimizing damage to the patient's normal cells.

    CONTAINS REFENCES

Tags: selenium, selenium and sulfur, selenium and cancer, selenium and diabetes, selenium and HIV, selenium and Aids, selenium and hepatitis, seleniun and insulin, selenium and thyroid, selenium and contact lenses, selenium and antioxidant, selenium and vitaimin E, selenium mineral, selenium supplement, selenium nutritional supplement, selenium dietary supplement, selenium mineral supplement

Selenium has not been evaluated or approved by the FDA for the any of the following topics indicated in the links above: AIDS/HIV, ALS / Lou Gehrig's disease, alzheimer's, cancer, diabetes, heavy metals, hepatitis, thyroiditis

Statements on this website have NOT been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are NOT intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease; research is ongoing. All third-party health topic links provided on this website are for information purposes only. Always consult your doctor or nutritionist about any health or nutrition-related questions you might have.

PLEASE READ FULL DISCLAIMER HERE

close