High Cholesterol and Heart Disease Health Topic

High Cholesterol and Heart Disease Health Topic

Abnormally high cholesterol levels (hypercholesterolemia); that is, higher concentrations of LDL and lower concentrations of functional HDL are strongly associated with cardiovascular disease.15 Too much cholesterol circulating in the blood can cause sticky deposits to form in the artery walls, blocking blood flow.1 HDLs are considered the good cholesterol as they prevent deposits of LDL cholesterol on artery walls.10

Cholesterol is an essential structural component of mammalian cell membranes, where it is required to establish proper membrane permeability and fluidity. In addition, cholesterol is an important component for the manufacture of bile acids, steroid hormones, and several fat-soluble vitamins. Within the cell membrane, cholesterol also functions in intracellular transport, cell signaling and nerve conduction.15

Statins, a popular set of drugs used to lower cholesterol, can result in muscle weakness and pain, and even debilitating and life-threatening muscle damage.3 Medications alone aren't the only means to lower cholesterol levels. The best alternative treatment is weight loss and eating better, exercise, and quitting smoking, which will give you the best results and may allow a person to avoid medications entirely.1 Recently researchers have confirmed that a diet rich in fiber and vegetables works just as well at controlling your increased cholesterol levels.9

Note: Essense-of-Life.com encourages personal research and a balanced view of health and nutrition topics. The links below provide a broad overview of various research findings and hypothesis on the role of nutrition in health. This information is not intended to promote any particular product. Unless noted, the articles below do not include any scientific references.


Learn More About High Cholesterol and Heart Disease

  1. Cholesterol Control: The Alternatives on WebMD

    Medications alone aren't the only means to lower cholesterol levels. Cholesterol is a natural part of fats in the bloodstream and in all the body's cells. Too much cholesterol circulating in the blood can cause sticky deposits to form in the artery walls, blocking blood flow. The best alternative treatment is weight loss and eating better, exercise, and quitting smoking, which will give you the best results and may allow a person to avoid medications entirely. Discusses positive effects of niacin, stanol esters, soluble fiber, and red yeast rice.

  2. Linus Pauling's Unified Theory and Therapy for Heart Disease

    Linus Pauling claimed that specific non-toxic substances called Lp(a) binding inhibitors taken orally will prevent and may even dissolve existing atherosclerotic plaque build-ups. Atherosclerotic plaques deposit in response to injury. The fallacy is that cholesterol causes heart disease, but plaque build-ups are the effect of heart disease. According to Pauling, the atherosclerotic plaques of coronary heart disease form only after cracks or stress fractures appear. This healing process begins with one very important "sticky" form of cholesterol. Atherosclerosis is a healing process. Like a scab, plaques form after a lesion or injury to the blood vessel wall. The Pauling/Rath unified theory blames a lack of a specific protein caused by a specific vitamin deficiency. Once Linus Pauling learned that Lp(a) has receptors for lysine, he knew how to counter the atherosclerosis process chemically. His invention, the Pauling Therapy, is to increase the concentration of this essential and non-toxic amino acid (and proline) in the blood serum. The Pauling and Rath theory postulates that the root cause of atherosclerotic plaque deposits is a chronic vitamin C deficiency which limits the collagen our bodies can make.

  3. How Statin Drugs Wreck Your Muscles

    Statins, a popular set of drugs used to lower cholesterol, can result in muscle weakness and pain, and even debilitating and life-threatening muscle damage.

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  4. Statin Side Effects: Do Doctors Take Patients' Complaints Seriously?

    It has been proven that statins can cause numbness in the limbs, cognitive and memory problems, muscle pain and severe muscle injury. Nevertheless, many doctors still insist that statins do not cause side effects. Some doctors in the study denied that statins caused nerve injuries, yet it has been shown unequivocally that patients taking statins are 16 times more likely to develop nerve injuries than similar persons receiving no medications.

    CONTAINS REFERENCES

  5. Co-Enzyme Q10 (Co-Q10), Statin Drugs, Heart Health and The Cholesterol Conspiracy

    Statin drugs reduce co-Q10 levels, and the consequences of co-Q10 deficiency can be devastating. All statin drugs block co-Q10 production, and cause depletion in the body, and results in detrimental effects on the heart, as well as the rest of the body. Since statin drugs can lead to decrease cardiac function (congestive heart failure) it is prudent for physcians to be aware to recommend that patients also take co-enzyme Q10 to prevent the depletion of co-Q10 by statin drugs with the resultant cardiac muscle weakening and possible destruction.

  6. Why Animals Don't Get Heart Attacks

    Downloadable E-Book that covers Atherosclerosis, High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol, Strokes, Diabetes, Heart Attacks and more.

  7. High Cholesterol is a Risk Factor for Heart Disease/Heart Attack

    Online risk assessment tool from the American Heart Association.

  8. At-Home Test for Coronary Heart Disease

    Coronary Heart Disease can be detected early with a C-Reactive Protein Test. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a substance produced by the liver and its levels increase during periods of inflammation. Though not condition specific, inflammation is a significant indicator of health problems such as coronary heart disease. In the absence of any specific disease, an increased CRP level poses a significant risk of coronary heart disease. Elevated levels of CRP is the first indicator of heart disease recommended by the American Heart Association in over 20 years and can be detected with a high sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Test (hs-CRP).

  9. The Cure for High Cholesterol

    Recently researchers have confirmed that a diet rich in fiber and vegetables works just as well at controlling your increased cholesterol levels. It was discovered that the low-fat diet lowered LDL, or "bad" cholesterol, by 8.5 percent, while the "portfolio" diet lowered LDL by nearly 30 percent. This "portfolio" diet particularly consists of almonds, cereal fiber, and plant sterols.

  10. The Effects of Coconut Oil on Serum Cholesterol Levels and HDLs

    Diets that cause an essential fatty acid deficiency always produce an increase in serum cholesterol levels as well as in increase in the atherosclerotic indices. Natural coconut oil, by increasing the good HDL cholesterol, may help prevent atherosclerosis and heart disease. HDLs are considered the good cholesterol as they prevent deposits of LDL cholesterol on artery walls. Dietary coconut oil does not lead to high serum cholesterol nor to high coronary heart disease.

  11. Cholesterol: The Top 5 Goods to Lower Your Numbers

    Diet can play an important role in lowering your cholesterol. Discusses oatmeal and oat bran, walnuts and almonds, fish and omega-3 fatty acids, olive oil, and plant sterols and stanols.

  12. Fish Oil, Fish Consumption, and Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Do They Lower Cholesterol?

    Omega-3 fatty acids, or fish oil, are polyunsaturated fats found in fish, fish oil, and in the form of supplements. They typically consist of a combination of polyunsaturated fatty acids that include DHA and EPA. The effectiveness of omega-3 fatty acids on triglycerides is dose-dependent, meaning that the more omega-3 fatty acids ingested, the lower your triglyceride levels will fall. This works best when following a healthy diet.

  13. Niacin (Vitamin B3) Lowers High Cholesterol Safely

    It is well established that niacin helps reduce harmful cholesterol levels in the bloodstream. Niacin is one of the best substances for elevating high density lipoprotein cholesterol (the "good cholesterol) and so decreases the ratio of the total cholesterol over high density cholesterol.

  14. High Cholesterol Levels May be Controlled by Vitamin C

    Vitamin C plays an important role in the regulation of the body's cholesterol levels. Most cholesterol is actually made by the body; only about 15-20% of the cholesterol in the blood is from our diets. Cholesterol is absolutely essential for making hormones and also forms an important part of the outside of cells (known as the cell's membrane). The cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, work by inhibiting (blocking) a key enzyme that helps make cholesterol in the body. Vitamin C inhibits the same enzyme that the statins do. Vitamin C also regulates cholesterol in a different way. It converts it into a substance called a bile acid, which is then broken down by the liver.

  15. Cholesterol on Wikipedia

    Cholesterol is a waxy steroid metabolite found in the cell membranes and transported in the blood plasma of all animals. It is an essential structural component of mammalian cell membranes, where it is required to establish proper membrane permeability and fluidity. Within the cell membrane, cholesterol also functions in intracellular transport, cell signaling and nerve conduction. In addition, cholesterol is an important component for the manufacture of bile acids, steroid hormones, and several fat-soluble vitamins. Abnormally high cholesterol levels (hypercholesterolemia); that is, higher concentrations of LDL and lower concentrations of functional HDL are strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. A small group of scientists continues to question the link between cholesterol and atherosclerosis.

  16. Uses of Aloe Products, e.g. Acemannan, in the Treatment of Diseases Requiring Intervention of the Immune System for Cure

    Acemannan has been shown to be effective in treating a number of conditions where the principal mechanism of resolution or cure requires intervention by the patient's immune system. Acemannan has direct stimulatory effects on the immune system. In addition, acemannan directly interacts with virus or other infectious organisms, infected cells, and tumor cells to produce changes in their immunologically sensitive surface composition to alter the appearance of these agents and cause them to be recognized by the body's immune system and then destroyed. This document contains 51 examples on research and studies on acemannan for wide range of diseases including high cholesterol (30). Male dogs given 855 mg/kg/day of acemannan had a statistically significant reduction in serum cholesterol levels. A similar effect was noted in normal male volunteers given doses of acemannan ranging from 400 mg to 3200 mg per day. An important effect of acemannan therapy which was observed was the statistically significant reduction in serum cholesterol level toward normal values for these subjects.

    PATENT APPLICATION

  17. Cooked Tomatoes 'As Good as Statins' for Battling Cholesterol

    Cooked tomatoes can have the same benefits as statins for patients battling against high cholesterol levels or high blood pressure. The secret lies in high levels of the compound lycopene which gives ripe tomatoes their bright red colour. This powerful anti-oxidant is essential for good health as it helps lower the risk of heart attacks and strokes.

  18. The "Heart Attack Proof" Diet

    Certain cultures around the world do not suffer from heart disease. "It's a foodborne illness, and we're never going to end the epidemic with stents, with bypasses, with the drugs, because none of it is treating causation of the illness," Esselstyn says. Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn Jr.'s diet has no meat, eggs, dairy or added oils. Esselstyn says his diet works because it keeps the lining of the blood vessels free of plaque Follow his dietary prescription, the 77-year-old Esselstyn says, and you will be "heart attack proof" -- regardless of your family history.

  19. Alleviating Congestive Heart Failure with Coenzyme Q10

    A coenzyme is a simple molecule (many vitamins are coenzymes) that is essential for the normal function of specific enzyme systems in our cells. Coenzyme Q10 is the cofactor or coenzyme for three large enzyme systems that are essential for 90% of cellular energy production. Because the heart muscle uses more energy than any other tissue and normally has the highest concentration of CoQ10, it is very sensitive to CoQ10 deficiency.

Tags: cholesterol and diet, cholesterol and statin drug risks, cholesterol and co-enzyme q10, cholesterol and coq10, cholesterol and lysine, cholesterol and vitamin c, cholesterol and coconut oil, cholesterol and omega-3 essential fatty acids, cholesterol and fish oil, cholesterol and vitamin b3, cholesterol and niacin, cholesterol and acemannan, cholesterol and aloe vera, cholesterol and lycopene, cholesterol and tomatoes

Statements on this website have NOT been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are NOT intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease; research is ongoing. All third-party health topic links provided on this website are for information purposes only. Always consult your doctor or nutritionist about any health or nutrition-related questions you might have.

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